West student raises money and awareness for Australia

Sophomore Niki Myers sold tiny stuffed koalas to her classmates in the hopes of making a difference down under

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West student raises money and awareness for Australia

Niki Mayers, a sophomore at MCHS, sells small koalas to raise money for the Australia fires.

Niki Mayers, a sophomore at MCHS, sells small koalas to raise money for the Australia fires.

Madison Wise

Niki Mayers, a sophomore at MCHS, sells small koalas to raise money for the Australia fires.

Madison Wise

Madison Wise

Niki Mayers, a sophomore at MCHS, sells small koalas to raise money for the Australia fires.

Elle Smith, Staff Writer

At West Campus, sophomore Niki Myers has found a way to raise awareness about the bushfires consuming Australia.

Many species of native animals dangle dangerously close to extinction as wildfires spread violently across the east coast of Australia. These fires started late 2019 and still burn out of control as of mid-January. 

In an attempt to spread awareness of this crisis and support the animals injured in the fire, Myers purchased 36 tiny stuffed koalas, each about two inches in size. She has sold 33 thus far, and priced them at two dollars each. She is going to donate all of the proceeds to a charity that houses koalas, not only bringing hope to each student who donates one, but offering them the opportunity to get involved too, and to make a difference. 

“I wanted to raise awareness, and raise money,” says Myers. 

Although Australia has a fire season which typically spans from December to March,  science and technology magazine New Scientist says that global climate change has lengthened this season. 

According to an article on npr.org and time.com, these fires have cost billions of animals their lives, and over 12 million acres have been burned, destroying over 1,400 homes, and causing at least 25 people lost their lives. As tragedy strikes eastern Australia, many people from different parts of the world struggle figuring out what they can do, and how they can help. 

Being a species native to Australia, an estimated 25,000 of these beloved marsupials have lost their lives in the fires thus far. Luckily, many charities are stepping in to do whatever they can to save as much wildlife as possible, and every donation counts. 

If you would like to make a donation to aid in the preservation of Australian wildlife, visit the NSW Rural Fire Service.

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